In the Name of Elijah lowest 2021 Muhammad: Louis Farrakhan and The Nation of Islam (The C. Eric Lincoln Series on the Black Experience) online sale

In the Name of Elijah lowest 2021 Muhammad: Louis Farrakhan and The Nation of Islam (The C. Eric Lincoln Series on the Black Experience) online sale

In the Name of Elijah lowest 2021 Muhammad: Louis Farrakhan and The Nation of Islam (The C. Eric Lincoln Series on the Black Experience) online sale
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In the Name of Elijah Muhammad tells the story of the Nation of Islam—its rise in northern inner-city ghettos during the Great Depression through its decline following the death of Elijah Muhammad in 1975 to its rejuvenation under the leadership of Louis Farrakhan. Mattias Gardell sets this story within the context of African American social history, the legacy of black nationalism, and the long but hidden Islamic presence in North America. He presents with insight and balance a detailed view of one of the most controversial yet least explored organizations in the United States—and its current leader.
Beginning with Master Farad Muhammad, believed to be God in Person, Gardell examines the origins of the Nation. His research on the period of Elijah Muhammad’s long leadership draws on previously unreleased FBI files that reveal a clear picture of the bureau’s attempts to neutralize the Nation of Islam. In addition, they shed new light on the circumstances surrounding the murder of Malcolm X. With the main part of the book focused on the fortunes of the Nation after Elijah Muhammad’s death, Gardell then turns to the figure of Minister Farrakhan. From his emergence as the dominant voice of the radical black Islamic community to his leadership of the Million Man March, Farrakhan has often been portrayed as a demagogue, bigot, racist, and anti-Semite. Gardell balances the media’s view of the Nation and Farrakhan with the Nation’s own views and with the perspectives of the black community in which the organization actively works. His investigation, based on field research, taped lectures, and interviews, leads to the fullest account yet of the Nation of Islam’s ideology and theology, and its complicated relations with mainstream Islam, the black church, the Jewish community, extremist white nationalists, and the urban culture of black American youth, particularly the hip-hop movement and gangs.

Review

“A unique and unprecedented view of the enigma of Louis Farrakhan. In putting it together, Gardell has masterfully interwoven the information from an impressive collection of documents not treated by other scholars. His access to Farrakhan and the information make this a very special study.”—Yvonne Haddad, author of Muslims in America


“An outstanding work, In the Name of Elijah Muhammad provides an in-depth analysis of the most recent changes in leadership and structure of the Nation of Islam. Gardell’s theological/ideological discussion is brilliant and insightful, while the chapter on the FBI’s counterintelligence program on the Nation of Islam is a stroke of genius. Gardell’s research is comprehensive, well documented, and powerful.”—Clifton E. Marsh, author of From Black Muslims to Muslims

From the Back Cover

"A unique and unprecedented view of the enigma of Louis Farrakhan. In putting it together, Gardell has masterfully interwoven the information from an impressive collection of documents not treated by other scholars. His access to Farrakhan and the information make this a very special study."--Yvonne Haddad, author of "Muslims in America"

About the Author

Mattias Gardell is Associate Professor in the Department of Theology at Uppsala University, Sweden.

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4.4 out of 54.4 out of 5
17 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Tehuti B.
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Broad Analysis
Reviewed in the United States on May 26, 2021
One of the first books that I''ve read that goes in depth with the tenets of the Nation Of Islam.
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Fareed Muhammad
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United States on April 2, 2015
Excellent reading for anyone
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Steven H Propp
5.0 out of 5 stars
A REASONABLY-SYMPATHATIC PORTRAIT OF FARRAKHAN AND THE NOI
Reviewed in the United States on February 22, 2020
Hans Bertil Mattias Gardell (born 1959) is a Swedish historian and scholar of comparative religion who teaches Comparative Religion at Uppsala University, Sweden. He wrote in the Preface to this 1996 book, “Most Americans I have met harbor strong opinions about... See more
Hans Bertil Mattias Gardell (born 1959) is a Swedish historian and scholar of comparative religion who teaches Comparative Religion at Uppsala University, Sweden.

He wrote in the Preface to this 1996 book, “Most Americans I have met harbor strong opinions about Minister Louis Farrakhan, the Nation of Islam, and American race dynamics. Though emotionally loaded, these views are not mainly based on actual facts but on the socially constructed and mass-mediated images that are themselves part of the problem… My hope is that this study will prove both entertaining and useful in promoting dialogue.” He adds in the Introduction, “Despite the fact that the Nation’s opinions are frequently debated, qualitative research is rare. Studies on the Nation… have bene based mainly on secondary sources of information due in part to the unwillingness of the NOI to be an object of academic inquiries. The present study, which is mainly based on field research, recorded interviews, taped lectures, and the writings of the movement’s spokespersons, aims to correct this unsatisfactory situation by presenting a comprehensive modern history of the Nation of Islam, with a particular emphasis on its ‘Second Resurrection’ commenced in 1977.” (Pg. 5)

He notes, “The creeds of the Moorish Science Temple and the Nation of Islam do have tenets in common, but these are better explained by reference to a exchange of ideas and the common roots in the black nationalist tradition, specifically the legacy of Marcus Garvey. The Nation of Islam commenced at the time when the Moorish Science Temple split into a number of warring factions, and many Moors were among the earliest individuals who were attracted by the NOI and who could feel at home in this new black Islamic nationalist movement.” (Pg. 51-52)

He recounts that after his pilgrimage to Mecca, Malcolm X “seemed to evolve toward a Third World-oriented revolutionary position before he was assassinated in 1965. On the surface, the NOI hierarchy appeared to be guilty, and three FOI [Fruit of Islam] soldiers were soon arrested… the NOT, branded as Malcolm’s killers, suffered a setback that would take years to overcome.” (Pg. 66)

He observes that “During the leadership of Elijah Muhammad, the Nation had developed into a strong economic force… the financial empire was tied to the Messenger personally. [Elijah’s son] Wallace Muhammad… noted that ‘the economic health of the Nation of Islam is not what it was projected to be.’… The privatization of the NOI companies, which were by many rank-and-file members viewed as their common property and an important source of pride, led to considerable internal criticism. Wallace Muhammed later defended his dismantling of the financial corporate body by stating that ‘the building of a material empire is not now, and has never been, the main object of religion.’” (Pg. 110) At time went on, “In some political respects, Imam Muhammad began to sound more like a conservative Christian than a black theologian of liberation… [He] became the first imam to offer morning prayers in the United States Senate.” (Pg. 112-113)

He records, “On September 17, 1985, Minister Farrakhan … received a vision in which his divine power was further reinforced. In the vision, Farrakhan walked up a mountain to an Aztec temple with some companions. When he got to the top of the mountain, a UFO appeared… a voice called Farrakhan to come closer… [he] was brought up into the plane on this beam of light… the spacecraft took off with Farrakhan, who knew that the pilot was sent by God and was to take him to the Mother Wheel… Farrakhan heard the well-known voice of the Honorable Elijah Muhammad, which confirmed his being alive… To Farrakhan and the believers, the significance of this vision cannot be overestimated. It proves not only that Elijah Muhammad is alive but that he is, in fact, the Christ who will return with power to slay his enemies in the final battle.” (Pg. 131-133)

He points out, “Because of the revealed doctrine of the divine self-creation occurring seventy-six trillion years ago, the NOI rejects … evolutionism … It is likewise necessary to disavow the existence of a time when dinosaurs ruled the earth. The NOI asserts that dinosaurs never existed except in the imagination of white scientists. They point to the fact that ‘scientists at the Smithsonian acknowledge that their displays are based on artists’ conceptions and limited findings.’” (Pg. 175)

He comments, “The …NOI understanding of the Shahada, identifying Master Farad Muhammad as God and Elijah Muhammad as the Messenger of God, is undoubtedly blasphemous in mainstream Islamic eyes… the vociferously militant attitude or the black nationalist Islamic movement further added to the animosity felt by many mainstream American Muslims, and some of their spokespersons officially denounced the NOI.” (Pg. 188)

He states, “The call for religious unity does not lessen Farrakhan’s critique of ‘white’ or ‘white-oriented’ Christianity. Delivering a sermon in a church, Farrakhan argues that he is ‘a better Christian than practically all the preachers of Christianity,’ because he is in the world, but not of the [Devil’s] world. He is a true Christian with personal knowledge of and friendship with Christ, that is, Elijah the Messiah… who has come to judge the wicked…. Very humbly, in the sight of God, I am much more important than the Pope…’” (Pg. 243)

He quotes Farrakhan’s controversial statement, “the Jews don’t like Farrakhan, so they call me Hitler. Well, that’s a good name. Hitler was a very great man. He wasn’t great for me as a black person, but he was a great German. Now, I’m not proud of Hitler’s evils against Jewish people, but that’s a matter of record. He raised Germany up from nothing.” (Pg. 252)

He observes, “Farrakhan had the Historical Research Department of the NOI initiate a study of Jewish involvement n the slave business, which was published in 1991 as ‘The Secret Relationship Between Blacks and Jews.’ Judged by the strict standards of historical scholarship, the study is absolutely unreliable… the study contains numerous fundamental methodological flaws… In ‘The Secret Relationship,’ the NOI authors build their case by using the very method they accuse the ADL of: decontextualization and highly selective reading.” (Pg. 260-261)

He points out that “the list of speakers invited to address the infamous 1985 Saviour’s Day convention… featured Arthur Butz…. [who] used the opportunity to present his Holocaust-denial thesis published in the revisionist best-seller, ‘The Hoax of the 20th Century.’” (Pg. 277)

He concludes, “Those who unequivocally condemn Minister Farrakhan and the Nation of Islam should pause to reflect on what they actually are attacking. Farrakhan is not so much a problem as he is a SYMPTOM of the problems presently tearing apart American society. Should Farrakhan disappear, he would be replaced by another voice produced by the same conditions that produced Farrakhan. The Nation is a consequence of the black experience, it is a SOCIAL PRODUCT stamped with a ‘Made in the U.S.A.’ Irrespective of one’s opinion of Minister Louis Farrakhan, his presence on the contemporary American scene points to issues that are impossible to avoid, as they are of key importance for the future of the American project. Perhaps it all boils down to one central question that needs to be addressed: Which way America?” (Pg. 349)

This book will be of great interest to those studying Louis Farrakhan and the Nation of Islam.
2 people found this helpful
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Daniel Pipes, Middle East Forum, Philadelphia
3.0 out of 5 stars
In the Name of Elijah Muhammad
Reviewed in the United States on July 31, 2001
Gardell�s impressive research results in a far richer and more subtle account of the NOI and Farrakhan. Immersing himself in the writings of the movement and in much else related to it (such as its connections to the FBI, Mu�ammar al-Qadhdhafi, and rap musicians) he has... See more
Gardell�s impressive research results in a far richer and more subtle account of the NOI and Farrakhan. Immersing himself in the writings of the movement and in much else related to it (such as its connections to the FBI, Mu�ammar al-Qadhdhafi, and rap musicians) he has produced an impressively thorough account. The study usefully covers other NOI branches, including the Lost Found Nation of Islam, the Five Percent Nation of Islam, and the Ansaaru Allah Community. Here�s where to find out about the NOI�s tentative moves toward mainstream Islam, its connections to American neo-Nazis, and its challenge to the black Christian churches. Gardell�s book is highly unusual in one way: although the author has many strange and tendentious ideas (that Reagan planned �for a war on Libya� in 1986, that Farrakhan is not an anti-Semite, that a mistress of Elijah Muhammad�s was his �Islamic wife,� that the 1992 Rodney King riots were �the bloodiest uprising of the twentieth century�), he does not slant the evidence but scrupulously offers information that directly disproves his own arguments. Most readers of In the Name of Elijah Muhammad will want to read the study for its facts while keeping a distance from Gardell�s conclusions.
Middle East Quarterly, March 1997
9 people found this helpful
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Randall J. Burns
1.0 out of 5 stars
Biased-Doesn''t get facts straight
Reviewed in the United States on February 9, 2001
I was rather appalled at how an obviously intelligent man could get basic facts mixed up. The author has some selective problems with reading comprehension and misquotes some of the literature of NOI. I used to live near the NOI headquarters in Chicago(I was a student at U... See more
I was rather appalled at how an obviously intelligent man could get basic facts mixed up. The author has some selective problems with reading comprehension and misquotes some of the literature of NOI. I used to live near the NOI headquarters in Chicago(I was a student at U of Chicago) and am in no way affiliated withthe NOI(i.e. I''m white)-I''ve read a couple of there books and this author simply couldn''t accurately represent their position. I can''t help but wonder what other errors there were lurking in here.
Frankly, whoever was this guy''s Ph.D. advisor ought to be ashamed of themselves.
3 people found this helpful
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Roshan
5.0 out of 5 stars
Well-balanced book
Reviewed in the United States on October 17, 2007
The self styled ''Nation of Islam'' is often subject due intense media scrutiny.To his credit the author gives a balanced view of the Nation of Islam, highlighting some of it''s good points, contextualizing some of it''s controversial issues and mentioning problems intrinsic to... See more
The self styled ''Nation of Islam'' is often subject due intense media scrutiny.To his credit the author gives a balanced view of the Nation of Islam, highlighting some of it''s good points, contextualizing some of it''s controversial issues and mentioning problems intrinsic to the ''Nation''. I would recommend this book to people intersted in getting to know the ''Nation of Islam''.
One person found this helpful
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Ask Doctor Java
1.0 out of 5 stars
Don''t be misled...
Reviewed in the United States on August 8, 1999
It is obvious after reading this book that the author has not even heard Farrakhan speak or at least did not listen with an open mind. I doubt that the author has even been to the mosque to hear any of the ministers. If you have an opinion on the Nation of Islam,... See more
It is obvious after reading this book that the author has not even heard Farrakhan speak or at least did not listen with an open mind.
I doubt that the author has even been to the mosque to hear any of the ministers.
If you have an opinion on the Nation of Islam, it is better to hear a speech first hand or talk directly to a member. Save your money by not buying this book.
3 people found this helpful
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breclark@indiana.edu
4.0 out of 5 stars
excellent inside view of the Nation of Islam
Reviewed in the United States on July 12, 1998
I used this book in a course at Indiana University about the Nation. It was by far the most broad and non-politicised of our texts. It does not represent the Nation as "orthododox" Muslims in any way, but it does not negate their significance to the history of... See more
I used this book in a course at Indiana University about the Nation. It was by far the most broad and non-politicised of our texts. It does not represent the Nation as "orthododox" Muslims in any way, but it does not negate their significance to the history of Islam in N America. I thought Garadell did a great job. Full of sources and notes. Of course he couldnot cover it all, but all around a good read. Especially with regaurd to Farrakhan.
2 people found this helpful
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In the Name of Elijah lowest 2021 Muhammad: Louis Farrakhan and The Nation of Islam (The C. Eric Lincoln Series on the Black Experience) online sale

In the Name of Elijah lowest 2021 Muhammad: Louis Farrakhan and The Nation of Islam (The C. Eric Lincoln Series on the Black Experience) online sale

In the Name of Elijah lowest 2021 Muhammad: Louis Farrakhan and The Nation of Islam (The C. Eric Lincoln Series on the Black Experience) online sale

In the Name of Elijah lowest 2021 Muhammad: Louis Farrakhan and The Nation of Islam (The C. Eric Lincoln Series on the Black Experience) online sale

In the Name of Elijah lowest 2021 Muhammad: Louis Farrakhan and The Nation of Islam (The C. Eric Lincoln Series on the Black Experience) online sale

In the Name of Elijah lowest 2021 Muhammad: Louis Farrakhan and The Nation of Islam (The C. Eric Lincoln Series on the Black Experience) online sale

In the Name of Elijah lowest 2021 Muhammad: Louis Farrakhan and The Nation of Islam (The C. Eric Lincoln Series on the Black Experience) online sale

In the Name of Elijah lowest 2021 Muhammad: Louis Farrakhan and The Nation of Islam (The C. Eric Lincoln Series on the Black Experience) online sale

In the Name of Elijah lowest 2021 Muhammad: Louis Farrakhan and The Nation of Islam (The C. Eric Lincoln Series on the Black Experience) online sale

In the Name of Elijah lowest 2021 Muhammad: Louis Farrakhan and The Nation of Islam (The C. Eric Lincoln Series on the Black Experience) online sale

In the Name of Elijah lowest 2021 Muhammad: Louis Farrakhan and The Nation of Islam (The C. Eric Lincoln Series on the Black Experience) online sale

In the Name of Elijah lowest 2021 Muhammad: Louis Farrakhan and The Nation of Islam (The C. Eric Lincoln Series on the Black Experience) online sale

In the Name of Elijah lowest 2021 Muhammad: Louis Farrakhan and The Nation of Islam (The C. Eric Lincoln Series on the Black Experience) online sale

In the Name of Elijah lowest 2021 Muhammad: Louis Farrakhan and The Nation of Islam (The C. Eric Lincoln Series on the Black Experience) online sale

In the Name of Elijah lowest 2021 Muhammad: Louis Farrakhan and The Nation of Islam (The C. Eric Lincoln Series on the Black Experience) online sale

In the Name of Elijah lowest 2021 Muhammad: Louis Farrakhan and The Nation of Islam (The C. Eric Lincoln Series on the Black Experience) online sale

In the Name of Elijah lowest 2021 Muhammad: Louis Farrakhan and The Nation of Islam (The C. Eric Lincoln Series on the Black Experience) online sale