Beatrix Potter's outlet sale Gardening Life: The Plants and Places That Inspired the Classic Children's outlet sale Tales sale

Beatrix Potter's outlet sale Gardening Life: The Plants and Places That Inspired the Classic Children's outlet sale Tales sale

Beatrix Potter's outlet sale Gardening Life: The Plants and Places That Inspired the Classic Children's outlet sale Tales sale
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Description

Product Description

A New York Times Bestseller

There aren’t many books more beloved than The Tale of Peter Rabbit and even fewer authors as iconic as Beatrix Potter. Her characters—Peter Rabbit, Jemima Puddle Duck, and all the rest—exist in a charmed world filled with flowers and gardens. In Beatrix Potter’s Gardening Life, bestselling author Marta McDowell explores the origins of Beatrix Potter’s love of gardening and plants and shows how this passion came to be reflected in her work.

The book begins with a gardener’s biography, highlighting the key moments and places throughout her life that helped define her. Next, follow Beatrix Potter through a year in her garden, with a season-by-season overview of what is blooming that truly brings her gardens alive. The book culminates in a traveler’s guide, with information on how and where to visit Potter’s gardens today.

From Booklist

Part of the charm and eye-delighting intricacy of Beatrix Potter’s beloved children’s books about such endearing and enduring characters as Peter Rabbit and Jemima Puddle-Duck are the precisely and vitally rendered illustrations of the English gardens, farms, and landscapes her characters so actively occupy. In this sumptuously illustrated “gardening biography,” horticultural consultant McDowell, who is fascinated by writers who garden (her first book was Emily Dickinson’s Gardens, 2004), fully illuminates Potter’s deep botanical knowledge and joy in cultivation. When publishers rejected her first attempt at a children’s book, Potter self-published The Tale of Peter Rabbit in 1902, launching a brilliant career. When she purchased Hill Top Farm in the fabled Lake District, she set out on the path that led to her becoming an intrepid gardener, savvy landowner, sheep breeder, and conservationist, ultimately leaving thousands of pristine acres to the National Trust. With wit and expertise, McDowell highlights the stamp of Potter’s horticultural know-how on her indelible books and chronicles a year in her exuberant gardens to create a visually exciting, pleasurably informative appreciation of Potter’s devotion to art and nature. --Donna Seaman

Review

“Stir your imagination. . . . a biography written through plants.” — The New York Times Book Review

“With wit and expertise, McDowell highlights the stamp of Potter’s horticultural know-how on her indelible books and chronicles a year in her exuberant gardens to create a visually exciting, pleasurably informative appreciation of Potter’s devotion to art and nature.” — Booklist

 “A loving portrait.” — Better Homes and Gardens

“You will be charmed by this book.” — Gardens Illustrated

“A richly illustrated exploration of Beatrix Potter’s evolution as an author-illustrator, gardener, sheep farmer and land preservationist.” Shelf Awareness

“Rarely does a gardening book blend such a rich love of nature, literature, home, and the magic of growing so beautifully. If you have a gardener in your life, this is the perfect holiday gift.” — Encore

“In her new book, Beatrix Potter’s Gardening Life, Marta McDowell expands our knowledge of Miss Potter horticultural expertise and background, explaining what she grew and where. There are photographs here that I have never seen before of Beatrix and her gardens, and delicious watercolors of rose hips and violets, clematis and honeysuckle, snapdragons and waterlilies—with and without rabbits, frogs and guileless ducks.” — The Telegraph

 “A volume rich with photographs and Potter’s own enchanting sketches and watercolors.” — The Chicago Tribune

“McDowell brings to light a delightfully different side of the celebrated author. . . . The book recounts Potter’s life through a gardening lens and is copiously illustrated with her sketches and watercolors of plants.” — American Gardener

“McDowell’s book is beautiful in every way. The fascinating narrative is liberally illustrated with both photographs and Potter’s original artwork, which includes botanical prints and paintings of gardens in addition to her iconic collection of children’s illustrations.” — Cape Codder

“This is not an historical novel with a plot, but neither is it a mere documentary of facts. It is the perfect blend of both.” — Alaska Airlines Magazine

“You may well want to buy a copy to keep and several to give friends. . . . McDowell’s well-researched book (including plant lists) is nearly as good as a visit to the farm. From a watercolor of Jemima Puddle-duck hiding from a fox among the foxgloves, to sepia photos of Potter strolling the garden paths on a frosty morning, the book is a visual delight.” — The Seattle Times

From the Back Cover

“Yes I have lots of flowers, I am very fond of my garden, it is a regular old fashioned farm garden, with a box hedge round the flower bed, and moss roses and pansies and black currants and strawberries and peas. . . . I have tall white bell flowers I am fond of. . . . next there will be phlox; and last come the michaelmas daisies and chrysanthemums. Then soon after Christmas we have snowdrops, they grow wild and come up all over the garden and orchard, and in some of the woods.” —Beatrix Potter

Beatrix Potter’s characters—Peter Rabbit, Jemima Puddle Duck, and all the rest—exist in a charmed world filled with flowers and gardens. Beatrix Potter’s Gardening Life is the first book to explore the origins of Beatrix Potter’s love of gardening and plants and show how this passion came to be reflected in her work. Richly illustrated and filled with quotations from her books, letters, and journals, it is essential reading for all who know and cherish Beatrix Potter’s classic tales.

About the Author

Marta McDowell lives, gardens, and writes in Chatham, New Jersey. She consults for public gardens and private clients, writes and lectures on gardening topics, and teaches landscape history and horticulture at the New York Botanical Garden, where she studied landscape design. Her particular interest is in authors and their gardens, the connection between the pen and the trowel.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Preface
First, a confession. I did not read Beatrix Potter as a child. In fact, I learned about Peter Rabbit from a knockoff of sorts. The spoiled youngest of four, I would steadily pester my mother for books on outings to Woolworths, and one day she bought me a shiny-covered Golden Book called Little Peter Cottontail by Thornton W. Burgess. Its naughty rabbit cavorted in wildflowers and visited a farm, but never found Mr. McGregor’s garden. My introduction to Beatrix Potter came much later in life.

In 1981, at a shower celebrating my upcoming nuptials, someone gave me a large cookie jar in the shape of a bonneted, apron-bedecked “porcupine” holding an iron. Wedding showers are awkward at best, particularly for learning about famous characters from childhood literature that one has somehow, in two-plus decades of life, managed to miss. What did I say when opening this gift in front of a sizeable, entirely female audience of friends, family, and future relations? That memory is lost. I have also repressed the identity of the gift-giver. Neither the Mrs. Tiggy-winkle cookie jar (a hedgehog, if you please) nor the marriage lasted long.

Fast-forward to 1997, when I set off with my second (and last) husband and two aged parents for a tour of Scotland and the Lake District. William Wordsworth was on our agenda. His homes, Dove Cottage and Rydal Mount, are both near Grasmere and not far from Windermere, where we were staying. And what of Beatrix Potter, that children’s author and artist?

Our visit to Hill Top Farm, Miss Potter’s beloved home on the other side of Windermere, turned out to be a highlight. For one thing, the sun came out that afternoon after a week of Scotland in the rain. (My mother, who had brought only one pair of shoes—my father would blow dry them for her every night in our B&B—was especially grateful.) The Hill Top garden was at its August peak; the tour was engaging.

I learned that day that Beatrix Potter was a gardener. I garden, though some days I feel that I do most of my gardening at the keyboard. I am intrigued by writers who garden and by gardeners who write. The pen and the trowel are not interchangeable, but seem often linked. Emily Dickinson, poet and gardener, has long been an obsession of mine. Edith Wharton interests me, and Jane Austen, both novelists with a gardening bent. I once read all of Nathaniel Hawthorne, winnowing his words for horticultural references. Gertrude Jekyll and Vita Sackville-West also oblige. And now there was Beatrix Potter.

So Beatrix Potter and the idea of her garden simmered quietly at the back of my mind. Over the years I saw some of Potter’s marvelous botanical watercolors at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and the Morgan Library & Museum in New York. Miss Potter, a Hollywood film, came and went. An adroit article by Peter Parker appeared in the gardening journal Hortus. But one day at the New York Botanical Garden shop, two books lay side by side on a display table: a new edition of Potter’s The Complete Tales and Linda Lear’s biography, Beatrix Potter: A Life in Nature. The simmer turned to a boil.

A few explanatory notes. You may be relieved or perturbed, depending on your druthers, that I have avoided botanical names in most of the book. Beatrix was not impressed with gardener’s Latin, so I have bowed to her feelings on the matter. For those of you who are looking for these particulars, you will find lists of the plants she grew, wrote about, and illustrated, including their proper nomenclature, at the end of the book. Her grammar, punctuation, and spelling were loose, particularly in her letters, but they are reproduced as she wrote them. I would encourage you to have copies of her Tales at hand. The stories with their illustrations are a joy to read. They will increase your understanding of both Beatrix Potter and her gardens.

Part One is a gardener’s biography of Beatrix Potter. In terms of her own name, I must beg her pardon on two counts. First, for taking the liberty of referring to her by her Christian name, I plead twenty-first-century customs. Second, during her married years I have generally stuck to her maiden name rather than switching to her preferred “Mrs. Heelis.” As she continued to use Potter professionally throughout her life, she would, I think, understand that it is by that name that we continue to know her best.

Part Two follows Beatrix Potter through a year in her gardens. When she lived with her husband at Castle Cottage, it is not always clear whether she and her correspondents are discussing the garden there or across the road at Hill Top Farm. So in describing the progress of her gardens through the seasons I hope I will be forgiven for smudging the lines a bit, as her efforts and enjoyment encompassed both.

Part Three is a traveler’s guide, intended as a lure to discover or rediscover Beatrix Potter’s Lake District and the other parts of Great Britain that influenced her. The gardens at Hill Top Farm alone would merit a visit, and there are many other gardens and landscapes that still have echoes of her.
 

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4.8 out of 54.8 out of 5
476 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

SusanHAH
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Between art and farming
Reviewed in the United States on July 31, 2016
This is a very interesting and well-designed book focusing on an important part of BP''s life and work that falls between art and farming. Pictures take up more than 50% of this smallish book, but the pictures are good-sized (many full page or double page) and very well... See more
This is a very interesting and well-designed book focusing on an important part of BP''s life and work that falls between art and farming. Pictures take up more than 50% of this smallish book, but the pictures are good-sized (many full page or double page) and very well reproduced, and include many I haven''t seen in other books, including early photos of BP in her gardens or Lake District landscapes, her drawings of Lakeland views, her watercolors of flowers (which I particularly love; they remind me of Japanese flower prints), and modern photographs of her gardens as they are today.

The text is also excellent, including quotes from many letters about her gardening experiences, and discussions of how her interests in plants are expressed in the little books. Gardening as Beatrix approached it included flowers, shrubs, trees, vegetables, and fruits, often mixed together; her gardening aesthetic was anything but formal. As she went about her mission of saving and restoring great swathes of Lake District landscape, eliminating anything unsightly, perfecting and protecting views, and creating harmony between agriculture and nature, her ideas as to what actually constituted a garden continued to expand; this work was, "in a sense, landscaping on a regional scale."
20 people found this helpful
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laura pitts
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Nice addition to a Beatrix Potter collection
Reviewed in the United States on January 27, 2017
As the author suggests, reading is enhanced if you have Beatrix Potter''s tales nearby for reference, as many scenes are described from real life (existing buildings and gardens) which are depicted in the stories. Some scenes of the stories are included near the detailed... See more
As the author suggests, reading is enhanced if you have Beatrix Potter''s tales nearby for reference, as many scenes are described from real life (existing buildings and gardens) which are depicted in the stories. Some scenes of the stories are included near the detailed descriptions, but not all.

The writer is straightforward and accurate. She notes in the preamble that she wasn''t really ''aware'' of Beatrix Potter until she received a cookie jar figurine at her wedding shower. I grew up with these books. I placed myself in the scenes; went into the rabbit burrow, fell into the watering can, ate bread and milk and blackberries for supper. Although I am only halfway through my copy of this as of last night and I feel there is a lack of the deep appreciation of humor and irony which is throughout Beatrix Potter''s writing. Kids won''t care, but as an adult, this almost feels more like I am reading a school book report. (Thus my ''good'' vs ''great'' rating on the writing itself.)

Still, this is a nice connection between Peter Rabbit''s life on the page and the reality of Beatrix Potter''s inspiration. It is also an inexpensive way to feel as if you have visited her still existing farm.

If you don''t have it already, buy this one first:
At Home with Beatrix Potter: The Creator of Peter Rabbit Paperback – May 1, 2009
by Susan Denyer
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Tea & Books
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Beautifully written.
Reviewed in the United States on January 9, 2019
n this charming and delightful book, Marta McDowell takes the reader on a personal journey, tracing the development and eventual blossoming of Beatrix Potter''s life as a gardener, from her early childhood interest in plants through her development as an artist to her final... See more
n this charming and delightful book, Marta McDowell takes the reader on a personal journey, tracing the development and eventual blossoming of Beatrix Potter''s life as a gardener, from her early childhood interest in plants through her development as an artist to her final years as an estate farmer and naturalist.

The reader follows Beatrix Potter through a year in her gardens, learning what she was growing in each season -- pansies, peas, foxgloves, pinks, roses, and currants, and all the other old-fashioned cottage plants that fill her illustrations.

The book also serves as a traveler''s guide to help the reader discover or rediscover Beatrix Potter''s Lake District, her garden at Hill Top Farm, and the many other gardens and landscapes that nourished her imagination.

Beautifully written and illustrated, Beatrix Potter''s Gardening Life: The plants and places that inspired the classic children''s tales'' is an enchanting portrait of the beloved writer and artist. A must read and one for the keeper shelf.
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Grace
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I COULDN''T LOVE THIS MORE!
Reviewed in the United States on June 19, 2021
I have been inspired by the life and tales of Beatrix Potter my whole life and try to read a biography of her every year. I say this book and was curious as to the contents inside, did NOT disappoint. There is so much of her art in this book, in their full color glory. The... See more
I have been inspired by the life and tales of Beatrix Potter my whole life and try to read a biography of her every year. I say this book and was curious as to the contents inside, did NOT disappoint. There is so much of her art in this book, in their full color glory. The pictures and paintings were always relevant to the subject Marta McDowell was talking about, and she pointed out so many interesting botanical details I never noticed, for instance that in Jemima Puddleduck every time "the foxy whiskered gentlemen" appears fox gloves are shown nearby. Or that the Tower Bank and Arms shown in the same illustration with Kep the sheep dog in Jemima is still standing and you can go visit it in the lake district! There is so much I learned about Beatrix Potters life, which frankly going into this book I thought the biographical aspect would be repetitive, but everything was so new to me. Beatrix Potter felt more real and dear and wonderful than ever. I think the beauty of this book lies in the fact that it has spoken much to do with the small details, places, and people that made an impact on her life, her garden, her art, and her home. Even if your not a gardener (which rest assured, there is PLENTY of gardening details and practices kept by Beatrix Potter), you can equally appreciate this book because plants were so intertwined with Beatrix Potters life. The art of Beatrix Potter (you''ll be surprised as to what a range she had!) and pictures of English gardens (formal and informal) are enough to purchase this on its own (and tidbits from her letters as well). Plus for those interested in the specific plants Beatrix grew there is a whole catalogue of her plants in the back of the book, one catalogue of her garden and one of the plants in her books. Also as a side note this is not boring reading in the slightest, the writing is well written yet not hard to comprehend, I say this as someone who''s brain wanders off a lot while reading dry non fiction. You can tell Marta McDowell had/has a passion for gardening and books, this really shows through on how well done this book is. Also I love how she discovered the work of Beatrix Potter as an adult, I think this shows that childrens lit (specifically Potters) can be enjoyed and appreciated by any age. Incase your confused as to where I stand, do not hesitate to buy this book, and if your buying as a present for a Potter fan there is nothing more inspiring and delightful then this book! So whether your a gardener, a artist, a history enthusiast, a scientist, a resident of the lake district, a traveler (yes there is a section for a Beatrix Potter garden trip around England), or a Beatrix Potter fan you will find something to love about this book.
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Not Old Yet
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
More than a biography
Reviewed in the United States on July 5, 2015
A friend recommended that our garden book club read this, and I''m glad she did. The book is divided into 4 sections; a biography of Beatrix Potter, a description of her garden through the season, a guide to visiting her gardens, and a plant list. I was familiar with... See more
A friend recommended that our garden book club read this, and I''m glad she did. The book is divided into 4 sections; a biography of Beatrix Potter, a description of her garden through the season, a guide to visiting her gardens, and a plant list. I was familiar with Potter''s illustrations in her children''s books, but was unaware of her other artwork.. She began doing botanical illustration as the age of 10. In addition to some of Potter''s artwork, there are also photographs of Potter and her gardens, so photos taken by Potter herself and some more contemporary. I enjoyed reading a biography that did not attempt to sully the person''s reputation. This book made me want to get out in my own garden and visit Potter''s gardens if I should visit England in the future. Potter was childless and her husband predeceased her, so much of her land was willed to the National Trust.
12 people found this helpful
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Owl
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Tale of Mrs. Heelis----A Splendid Story of Beatrix Potter and Her Many Gardens
Reviewed in the United States on November 15, 2013
Marta McDowell''s "Beatrix Potter''s Gardening Life" is almost sure to delight all who lovingly remember the stories of Peter Rabbit, Squirrel Nutkin, and Jemima Puddle-Duck which readied us for meeting Mole, Water Rat, Toad, and Badger. Even better, if these admirers of... See more
Marta McDowell''s "Beatrix Potter''s Gardening Life" is almost sure to delight all who lovingly remember the stories of Peter Rabbit, Squirrel Nutkin, and Jemima Puddle-Duck which readied us for meeting Mole, Water Rat, Toad, and Badger. Even better, if these admirers of Beatrix Potter are slightly mad about gardens and wander in their dreams among the dreaming spires of English foxgloves & delphiniums. (In this review, as in McDowell''s book, Beatrix Potter is sometimes referred to as Beatrix, sometimes as Beatrix Potter, and after her marriage, sometimes as Mrs. Heelis. Hopefully, this won''t be confusing.)

This richly created book offers on almost every page superbly reproduced water colors of landscapes, plants, and the small creatures of hedgerow and streams, or photographs of the more than 10 homes in which Beatrix lived and gardened. No one, not even Durer, has drawn bunnies like Beatrix Potter, bunnies with the softest fur, and on p. 106, the roundest tummies, as six lie together sleeping off the soporific effects of a lettuce orgy.

Part One of this three part tale describes Beatix Potter''s life in McDowell''s framework of a plant: germination, offshoots, flowering, roots, ripening, and setting seed (140 pages bursting with the child''s precociously talented paintings through her final flowering as a conservationist who wills 4,000 acres of Lake District lands to the National Trust).

Beatrix was the only daughter of second generation wealth. To her supremely status-conscious parents, almost no one was good enough for her company or her love, making her early life lonely. She turned to drawing & botanical research. But a scientific society rejected her exquisite portfolio of mushroom paintings & original studies of spore germination, turning her forever away from formal scientific work. We share her sorrow at her first betrothed''s sudden death and we cheer for her eventual declaration of independence in marrying a second suitor, Mr. William Heelis of Sawrey in the Lake district, with whom she shared 33 years.

Part Two has the happy format of classics on gardening: following a year in Beatrix Potter''s gardens. The wealthy Potters had summer, winter and spring abodes & Beatrix planted where she bloomed. Here, McDowell relies on Beatrix''s letters and diaries as well as her own professional knowledge to tell what Mrs. Heelis & her Willie were seeing, planting, harvesting----and she uses the Tales & their paintings to show how closely Potter intertwined her plants and the poetry of her stories. For instance, the plants surrounding that devious ginger-whiskered fellow, Mr. Tod, are foxgloves. Peter''s iconic radish picture is so precise, we can plant seeds of the same fine nibble. The writing in this section is enchanting: for instance, "Poppies unfurl their buds like butterflies from cocoons." (p 127). That''s McDowell, not Potter.

The third major section is to me, most magical. Mc Dowell followed the path of Potter, visiting each place she once lived or visited. The result is both a travel guide and history. Photographs and paintings of Beatrix''s gardens in her time are shown next to pictures and descriptions of what remains now. This is written as informally as letters home, with details on roads to take, car parks (or not), inns, B&Bs, as well as the gardens themselves.

As with all gardens, even those as lovingly maintained as Sackville-West''s Sissinghurst, much is changed. McDowell writes of Hill Top Farm, Beatrix''s first "all hers" home place:

"As you look at the garden and its swath of flowers, [you must] realize that few of [Beatrix''s] actual plants...are still growing in the garden. The trick to preservation gardening is to keep the garden looking more or less as it did in her day, while dealing with the inexorable fact that plants grow, spread, and sooner or later die."

So do we all, but in this book, the landscapes of Jeremy Fisher and of Flopsy, Mopsy, and Cottontail live again, as does that remarkable artist, gardener, and woman, Beatrix Potter.

For gardeners, this book is enhanced by lists of plants Beatrix Potter grew in her farms and showed in her books (splendid idea!). In "The Tale to Tom Kitten," for instance, 18 plants are painted in loving detail, from Japanese anemones to water lilies.

Any reader alerts? This is a gardening biography, not a comprehensive analysis of Potter''s tales & writing, not an in-depth analysis of her life and art, and definitely not a guide for gardeners on design & planting. McDowell gives generous and extensive recommendations for in-depth reading on all these points, together with a good index and a comprehensive bibliography of Potter''s books. It is rather something magical, the tale of how a great talent unfolded against the odds, and was realized in earthly gardens and in the numinous landscapes of her stories.

If this appeals to your child, reader, artist, and the gardener within----highly, very highly recommended. It is a unique, beautiful, and altogether lovely book.
34 people found this helpful
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V Johnson
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Amazingly Perfect Book
Reviewed in the United States on September 26, 2016
I am so glad I bought this perfect book. It has the right amount of words, her art and pictures. There were a lot of photos of her I have never seen especially one where she is sitting in her garden holding her huge pet rabbit in her lap. That should be one always shown... See more
I am so glad I bought this perfect book. It has the right amount of words, her art and pictures. There were a lot of photos of her I have never seen especially one where she is sitting in her garden holding her huge pet rabbit in her lap. That should be one always shown when anything pertaining to her is noted publicly yet I have never seen it. Each page has words and illustrations/pictures which are totally in balance. Neither overwhelms the other and the words flow so well. The author is not trying to fill up space with too many words or descriptions-just the right amount that flows in to the next. I learned so many things about her.
The price is very fair and I would buy again. It is a treasure I will look at many times. I actually felt like I was there in her home and gardens.
My thank you to the author! And Beatrix too.
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Bree
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Exceeded my expectations
Reviewed in the United States on September 11, 2021
I recently became enthralled with Beatrix Potter because of her watercolors. This lead me to discover all of her other delightful children’s stories, her love of animals, plants, conservation, and gardening. This book has many wonderful photographs, watercolors, and... See more
I recently became enthralled with Beatrix Potter because of her watercolors. This lead me to discover all of her other delightful children’s stories, her love of animals, plants, conservation, and gardening. This book has many wonderful photographs, watercolors, and further insight into this remarkable woman. Well done! Very happy with this purchase. I also recommend the movie, “Miss Potter. With Renee Zelwiger.
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Top reviews from other countries

Michelle Smith
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I found it great to read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 4, 2017
I had the Kindle version which spoils the illustrations but you can enlarge the illustrations. I found it great to read, better than I thought, it reads very nice and is very informative about the properties that Beatrix owned. I liked the way it talked about weeds...See more
I had the Kindle version which spoils the illustrations but you can enlarge the illustrations. I found it great to read, better than I thought, it reads very nice and is very informative about the properties that Beatrix owned. I liked the way it talked about weeds occasionally being allowed to grow amongst perrennials (Rose bay Willowherb) and the hard work that goes in to a garden and how buying a new plant and watching it grow is reallly exciting. I read it in a couple of days in the garden.
One person found this helpful
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Swany
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not ONLY for Beatrix Potter fans!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 14, 2014
Anyone interested in gardening, biography, and the creative process will find this book enchanting. Potter was far more than just the creator of Peter Cottontail and Mr. McGregor; she was a watercolorist, a farmer, an enchanting personality. This elegant book''s carefully...See more
Anyone interested in gardening, biography, and the creative process will find this book enchanting. Potter was far more than just the creator of Peter Cottontail and Mr. McGregor; she was a watercolorist, a farmer, an enchanting personality. This elegant book''s carefully researched text, accompanied by period photographs, Potter illustrations, and recent photographs, captures Potter''s wide-ranging interests. The book shows us a complex and accomplished woman.
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customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Hardback
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 3, 2021
Lovely book. Beautiful illustrations. A keeper! Would make a great present for Beatrix Potter fans that are gardeners.
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Mary Ewen
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Lovely book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 5, 2021
This is a really lovely book With loves illustrations
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Lynette Carole
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Beautiful book.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 30, 2020
Beautiful book brought as a gift and the recipient of the book was very happy indeed. Lovely illustrations Highly recommend
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Beatrix Potter's outlet sale Gardening Life: The Plants and Places That Inspired the Classic Children's outlet sale Tales sale

Beatrix Potter's outlet sale Gardening Life: The Plants and Places That Inspired the Classic Children's outlet sale Tales sale

Beatrix Potter's outlet sale Gardening Life: The Plants and Places That Inspired the Classic Children's outlet sale Tales sale

Beatrix Potter's outlet sale Gardening Life: The Plants and Places That Inspired the Classic Children's outlet sale Tales sale

Beatrix Potter's outlet sale Gardening Life: The Plants and Places That Inspired the Classic Children's outlet sale Tales sale

Beatrix Potter's outlet sale Gardening Life: The Plants and Places That Inspired the Classic Children's outlet sale Tales sale

Beatrix Potter's outlet sale Gardening Life: The Plants and Places That Inspired the Classic Children's outlet sale Tales sale

Beatrix Potter's outlet sale Gardening Life: The Plants and Places That Inspired the Classic Children's outlet sale Tales sale

Beatrix Potter's outlet sale Gardening Life: The Plants and Places That Inspired the Classic Children's outlet sale Tales sale

Beatrix Potter's outlet sale Gardening Life: The Plants and Places That Inspired the Classic Children's outlet sale Tales sale